Controllable flying insects using Texas Instruments technology

Michel Maharbiz, associate professor in the EECS department, uses electronics and microcontroller technology to change the flight path of live beetles in real-time.
“Increasingly, we have to grapple with the understanding that the technology we develop is getting so small and low-power that the ability to put it into organisms is very high… We say, ‘Look, you have to start thinking about this because you can do it.’”

Controllable flying insects using Texas Instruments technology

Michel Maharbiz, associate professor in the EECS department, uses electronics and microcontroller technology to change the flight path of live beetles in real-time.

“Increasingly, we have to grapple with the understanding that the technology we develop is getting so small and low-power that the ability to put it into organisms is very high… We say, ‘Look, you have to start thinking about this because you can do it.’”

pbsthisdayinhistory:

Sept. 12, 1992: Dr. Mae Jemison Becomes First African American Woman in Space

On this day in 1992, Dr. Mae Jemison became the first African American woman to travel through space. She served as Mission Specialist aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-47.

WTCI’s Alison Lebovitz discusses the legacy of the first woman of color to travel beyond the stratosphere on “The A List with Alison Lebovitz.” Watch the interview here.

Photos: NASA

From our friends at the Berkeley Lab:

At Berkeley Lab, we pride ourselves on great, socially responsible ideas. But can we explain them in a way that non-scientists can understand — and applaud — in only 8 minutes? The answer is yes and we will prove it on October 8 at Oakland’s Kaiser Center Auditorium from 7-9 p.m. when 8 Berkeley Lab scientists take the stage to bring you the latest on everything from solar-powered vaccine refrigerators and cool roof maps to radiation pills and space dust. Refreshments will be served.
 
Please RSVP here.

From our friends at the Berkeley Lab:

At Berkeley Lab, we pride ourselves on great, socially responsible ideas. But can we explain them in a way that non-scientists can understand — and applaud — in only 8 minutes? The answer is yes and we will prove it on October 8 at Oakland’s Kaiser Center Auditorium from 7-9 p.m. when 8 Berkeley Lab scientists take the stage to bring you the latest on everything from solar-powered vaccine refrigerators and cool roof maps to radiation pills and space dust. Refreshments will be served.

 

Please RSVP here.

kqedscience:

Researchers Have Vision-Correcting Computer Screens in Their Sights
What if everyone could clearly see their phone and computer screens without wearing eyeglasses or contact lenses? Researchers have developed new vision-correcting display technology that could help make this a reality. Learn more from Jennifer Huber of Lawrence Berkeley National Lab and UC Berkeley at KQED Science.

kqedscience:

Researchers Have Vision-Correcting Computer Screens in Their Sights

What if everyone could clearly see their phone and computer screens without wearing eyeglasses or contact lenses? Researchers have developed new vision-correcting display technology that could help make this a reality. Learn more from Jennifer Huber of Lawrence Berkeley National Lab and UC Berkeley at KQED Science.

Examining mechanisms that provide an insect with a sense of smell isn’t as glamorous as developing a mobile app that could be worth billions of dollars. But such research might lead to fighting mosquito-borne diseases like malaria - saving lives and generating billions of dollars.

Thomas Lee on the power of basic research (and Janet Napolitano’s message at the OpenSDx Summit):

As Napolitano correctly noted, the private sector has pretty much outsourced basic research, which can be time consuming, expensive and unprofitable, to public universities. Yet taxpayer support for public universities has fallen dramatically over the past 20 years.

(via ucresearch)

ucresearch:

Eliminating lawn mower pollution


Cutting your grass with a gas powered mower is 11 times more polluting than driving a car.  Students at UC Riverside have developed a small device to cut down on these emissions.

Essentially it fits into the exhaust pipe and can get rid of up to 87% of pollutants:

The device can be thought of as a three stage system. First, a filter captures the harmful pollutants. Then an ultra-fine spray of urea solution is dispersed into the exhaust stream. The urea spray primes the dirty air for the final stage, when a catalyst converts the harmful nitrogen oxide and ammonia into harmless nitrogen gas and water and releases them into the air.

Their invention could be sold to consumers for around $30.  the next incoming team of students will be looking to scale it up for riding mowers and find ways to insulate it.

You can read more about the device here.

skunkbear:

Another example of applied origami: these self-assembling robots created by Samuel Felton and his colleagues at the Harvard Microrobotics Lab. The robots are built with a special shape-memory polymer, with hinges that fold when heated by a circuit.

Look out Optimus Prime!

Image: Seth Kroll, Wyss Institute / Video: Samuel Felton