Sofia Hamilton, CEE

Berkeley has been an awesome experience and although it can be tough and intimidating at times, if you can do Berkeley Engineering you can probably do anything—you’re stronger than you realize, so go out there and say ‘yes’ to whatever crazy experiences come your way!

Sofia Hamilton, CEE

Berkeley has been an awesome experience and although it can be tough and intimidating at times, if you can do Berkeley Engineering you can probably do anything—you’re stronger than you realize, so go out there and say ‘yes’ to whatever crazy experiences come your way!

Ninja walker

One team in Professor Amy Herr’s senior capstone bioengineering course came up with an elegant solution to improve on walkers for the elderly that don’t fit into tight spaces. The team designed a curved two-position walker that is made with conventional materials, like aluminum tubing and plastic wheels, but is unconventional in appearance and operation. Fully extended, its semi-circular shape functions as effectively as a typical rectangular-shaped walker. In its smaller, quarter-circle configuration, the walker’s petite footprint allows it to function more like a rolling cane.

Read more at our website.
Photo: A prototype Demilune walker in its fully extended (left) and quarter-circle (right) configurations.

Ninja walker

One team in Professor Amy Herr’s senior capstone bioengineering course came up with an elegant solution to improve on walkers for the elderly that don’t fit into tight spaces. The team designed a curved two-position walker that is made with conventional materials, like aluminum tubing and plastic wheels, but is unconventional in appearance and operation. Fully extended, its semi-circular shape functions as effectively as a typical rectangular-shaped walker. In its smaller, quarter-circle configuration, the walker’s petite footprint allows it to function more like a rolling cane.

Read more at our website.

Photo: A prototype Demilune walker in its fully extended (left) and quarter-circle (right) configurations.

What is data science/big data anyway?

“The first rule of data science is: don’t ask how to define data science.”
“It’s not a discipline; it’s not a branch of science; it’s a platform for building a coalition. It’s one of these interdisciplinary, non-disciplinary spaces where people get stuff done in interesting ways, but don’t even know what to call it themselves.”
“‘Data science’ and ‘big data’ are popular terms for the application of statistics and computer science to analyzing the large amounts of data and learning about the underlying processes generating the data that we’re seeing today in various domains, such as e-commerce, biological sequencing studies, sensor networks, etc.”

Read more about data science and the future of computing at the Berkeley Science Review.

What is data science/big data anyway?

The first rule of data science is: don’t ask how to define data science.”

“It’s not a discipline; it’s not a branch of science; it’s a platform for building a coalition. It’s one of these interdisciplinary, non-disciplinary spaces where people get stuff done in interesting ways, but don’t even know what to call it themselves.”

“‘Data science’ and ‘big data’ are popular terms for the application of statistics and computer science to analyzing the large amounts of data and learning about the underlying processes generating the data that we’re seeing today in various domains, such as e-commerce, biological sequencing studies, sensor networks, etc.”

Read more about data science and the future of computing at the Berkeley Science Review.

Nobel Prizes are not awarded because researchers figured out how to make a lot of money. They are awarded because researchers transformed, at some level, our understanding of the human experience, and all that goes on in the universe that we call home.

University of California President Janet Napolitano discussing the importance of basic research.

Listen to her talk here →

(via ucresearch)


A post to the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy blog last week recognized mechanical engineering professor Lydia Sohn for her prize-winning submission to a competition seeking the most compelling ideas for revolutionary life science platform technologies. Sohn’s idea? A low-cost, label-free platform to screen and sort single-cells for multiple surface markers.

A post to the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy blog last week recognized mechanical engineering professor Lydia Sohn for her prize-winning submission to a competition seeking the most compelling ideas for revolutionary life science platform technologies. Sohn’s idea? A low-cost, label-free platform to screen and sort single-cells for multiple surface markers.

Surmayee Tetarbe, NucE

Berkeley was an eye-opening experience for me. The key, honestly, was balance—while I am an engineer at heart, my passions outside the classroom truly helped me become who I am today. Really explore what makes you tick, take classes outside of engineering, and experiment with extracurriculars!

Surmayee Tetarbe, NucE

Berkeley was an eye-opening experience for me. The key, honestly, was balance—while I am an engineer at heart, my passions outside the classroom truly helped me become who I am today. Really explore what makes you tick, take classes outside of engineering, and experiment with extracurriculars!